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Engineering  |  FURI

Glenna Bea Embrador

Hometown: Phoenix, Arizona | Graduation Date: Spring 2020
Biomedical engineering

Utilizing Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi) to Alleviate Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Pathology

Research Theme: Health
MORE: Spring 2020

Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), the body initiates pro-inflammatory responses which in excess, may lead to neurodegeneration. Recent studies report histone deacetylases (HDAC) as a key player in modulating neuroinflammation, rendering it as an attractive target for TBI therapeutics. Current HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) has shown efficacious treatment in cancer applications by modulating gene expressions of cancerous cells. However, there has been limited research selecting the most effective and potent HDACi for TBI applications. This project aims to test the efficacy of HDACi in reducing neuroinflammation in vitro using human astrocyte cultures.

Other Projects

Optimizing Recombinant Protein Production for Domain Antibodies: Proof-of-Concept

Research Theme: Health
FURI: Spring 2019

Recent studies in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have found a temporal window where nanometer scale therapeutics can cross the blood-brain barrier into the parenchyma. Development of recombinant antibody production is attractive due to its wide range of biological applications in diagnostic and therapeutic use. However, the production pipeline for high yield, purified, and consistent bioactive recombinant proteins remains a major obstacle. This project aims to optimize this methodology and evaluate the potential to use Brevibacillus host to produce biologically active domain antibody proteins for future use in nanoparticle therapeutics.

Optimizing recombinant protein production for domain antibodies: proof-of-concept

Research Theme: Health
FURI: Fall 2018

Recent studies in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have found a temporal window where therapeutics on the nanometer scale can cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the parenchyma. Developing protein-based therapeutics is attractive for a number of reasons, yet, the production pipeline for high yield and consistent bioactive recombinant proteins is a major obstacle. This project directly addresses this issue and evaluates the potential to use Brevibacillus host to produce biologically active domain antibody proteins for future use in nanoparticle therapeutics.

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