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Engineering  |  FURI

Matthew Chrest

Hometown: Murrieta, California | Graduation Date: Spring 2020
Biomedical engineering

Creating a Multi-Modal Near Infrared Photoacoustic Fluorescence Microscopy System for In Vivo Imaging

Research Theme: Health
MORE: Spring 2020

Current optical imaging techniques have a limited penetration depth based on the high attenuation of visible light in biological tissue. Fluorescent and photoacoustic microscopy are methods currently used to explore in vivo tissue samples. However beneficial, these current techniques still lack penetration depth past 2 mm. By utilizing both fluorescence and photoacoustics, and by incorporating near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths, we are creating a multi-disciplinary microscopy platform where imaging at a greater depth can be achieved. Through this research, we aim to create value for neuroscientists by developing technology that will assist them in better understand neuronal interactions.

Other Projects

The Adaptive Omphalocele Protective Device

Research Theme: Health
KEEN: Spring 2019

The Adaptive Omphalocele Protective Device is a novel medical device created in partnership with Phoenix Children’s Hospital (PCH), which helps families safely transport their children born with an omphalocele birth defect. An omphalocele is a birth defect in which the abdominal organs of the child balloon out of the abdomen. This defect leads to complications with transporting the child home safely due to pressure and shear forces acting on the defect. The intended device design will provide protection to the defect while allowing for safe and easy transport of the child.

Photoacoustic Flowmetry

Research Theme: Health
FURI: Fall 2018

Locating circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is crucial as they yield prognosis information for ovarian cancer. Current methods used to diagnose ovarian cancer include documenting CA-125 concentrations and transvaginal ultrasounds. It is difficult to find and differentiate between CTCs and other cells already circulating through blood. This study will discuss the use of photoacoustic flowmetry (PAF) to locate CTCs that have been coated with CuS nanoparticles circulating through a designed flow system. The hypothesis is that the CuS nanoparticles will bind to the CTCs using folic acid due to the folic acid receptors on CTCs.

Photoacoustic Flow Cytometry

Research Theme: Health
FURI: Spring 2018

The objective of this research is to detect the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in a custom designed flow system. Determining the location of CTCs is crucial, as they indicate the presence of cancer and can provide diagnostically relevant information, such as the stage of cancer development. It is difficult to detect CTCs in blood, so to aid in their detection, copper-sulfide nanoparticles are functionalized to bind specifically to ovarian cancer CTCs. The nanoparticles act as a photoacoustic contrast agent, allowing for the detection of CTCs through photoacoustic flowmetry (PAF) in a custom designed flow system.

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